Posts tagged Collaboration

4 Notes

Scott (pictured below), who is both a gentleman and a scholar, sent me what will likely be the last collaborative effort I post for the time being. He writes, 
"I decided to take a stab at your photo. And by that I mean I decided to be very violent and stab your photo to death. In my defense it wasn’t premeditated - I was gonna be all subtle like Lydia, but you and I (and Lydia) know subtlety isn’t exactly my specialty. I love collaboration because it gives me a chance to do something I wouldn’t normally even consider doing, and in the end I often see results that are much more relaxed than usual. I would also like to say thanks because it’s been a while since I had fun with Photoshop and sometimes when I get lost in PS I feel like a real artist. Enjoy."

Scott (pictured below), who is both a gentleman and a scholar, sent me what will likely be the last collaborative effort I post for the time being. He writes, 

"I decided to take a stab at your photo. And by that I mean I decided to be very violent and stab your photo to death. In my defense it wasn’t premeditated - I was gonna be all subtle like Lydia, but you and I (and Lydia) know subtlety isn’t exactly my specialty. I love collaboration because it gives me a chance to do something I wouldn’t normally even consider doing, and in the end I often see results that are much more relaxed than usual. I would also like to say thanks because it’s been a while since I had fun with Photoshop and sometimes when I get lost in PS I feel like a real artist. Enjoy."

2 Notes

Jared Falk’s version of one of my photographs. He didn’t send along any commentary so I’ll just let the image speak for itself.

Jared Falk’s version of one of my photographs. He didn’t send along any commentary so I’ll just let the image speak for itself.

1 Notes

Another splendid collaboration piece featuring Susan McDougall. Unfortunately the width limit Tumblr imposes doesn’t do this version justice so make sure to click on the image to view it larger. Susan writes,
"This is probably a motif that I would return to again and again. It’s especially effective with all of those dramatic clouds. Personally, I might want to shoot this as a panorama with a few verticals stitched together - huge file, I know! A few of the edits I made were emphasizing the thin gold line of the field that the trees are "sitting on", heightening the contrast in some areas, eliminating some of the clouds along the edge of the frame in the blue patch, and trying to reclaim some of the definition in the bright centre patch among the clouds. In the ‘panorama’, I lightened two of the trees so as to allow the eye to pass beyond the tree barrier to the clouds beyond. I know this cropped version is not sharp but this is my vision for this particular landscape. I need to find my own row of trees!"

Another splendid collaboration piece featuring Susan McDougall. Unfortunately the width limit Tumblr imposes doesn’t do this version justice so make sure to click on the image to view it larger. Susan writes,

"This is probably a motif that I would return to again and again. It’s especially effective with all of those dramatic clouds. Personally, I might want to shoot this as a panorama with a few verticals stitched together - huge file, I know! A few of the edits I made were emphasizing the thin gold line of the field that the trees are "sitting on", heightening the contrast in some areas, eliminating some of the clouds along the edge of the frame in the blue patch, and trying to reclaim some of the definition in the bright centre patch among the clouds. In the ‘panorama’, I lightened two of the trees so as to allow the eye to pass beyond the tree barrier to the clouds beyond. I know this cropped version is not sharp but this is my vision for this particular landscape. I need to find my own row of trees!"

3 Notes

Stephen Leung’s version of one of my photographs. Of the all the submissions I’ve received so far, this one comes closest to how I would personally approach this photograph (I’ll post my edit later). 
Stephen writes, “It’s such a good photo on its own, so I didn’t want to do anything too crazy with the processing. I applied my Lightroom preset (which ups the contrast a tad and slightly adjusts the tone curve). Then I lowered the exposure to make the clouds pop and added a graduated filter to give the ground proper exposure.”
Thanks again to everyone who has submitted. I’ve really enjoyed seeing the variety of approaches different artists bring to the same image. More to come.

Stephen Leung’s version of one of my photographs. Of the all the submissions I’ve received so far, this one comes closest to how I would personally approach this photograph (I’ll post my edit later).

Stephen writes, “It’s such a good photo on its own, so I didn’t want to do anything too crazy with the processing. I applied my Lightroom preset (which ups the contrast a tad and slightly adjusts the tone curve). Then I lowered the exposure to make the clouds pop and added a graduated filter to give the ground proper exposure.”

Thanks again to everyone who has submitted. I’ve really enjoyed seeing the variety of approaches different artists bring to the same image. More to come.

9 Notes

Melissa Olson’s fantastic contribution. She writes,
"I’ve been going through a lot lately, but my nature is to be optimistic. I’m hoping for the best, but a lot of things are really far off and almost entirely living in the recesses of my imagination. I loved this photograph immediately for it’s focus on the line of trees while simultaneously putting them in the distance and diminishing their importance. I cannot express to you how much I’ve learned about the fragility of life and of emotions like love in the last two weeks. Even when you lose someone, it’s important to keep on moving, and to maintain even the dimmest of lights and the subtlest of colors. Even when everything seems like it’s fading away, there will always be a line of brilliant trees waiting and growing on the horizon. I don’t know if this metaphor will make sense to anyone else, but I can’t think of a better way to describe how I’ve been feeling lately. I don’t feel like the trees are getting any closer as the days go by, but I can still see them."
You can read more about the project here.
Her website.
Her tumblog.

Melissa Olson’s fantastic contribution. She writes,

"I’ve been going through a lot lately, but my nature is to be optimistic. I’m hoping for the best, but a lot of things are really far off and almost entirely living in the recesses of my imagination. I loved this photograph immediately for it’s focus on the line of trees while simultaneously putting them in the distance and diminishing their importance. I cannot express to you how much I’ve learned about the fragility of life and of emotions like love in the last two weeks. Even when you lose someone, it’s important to keep on moving, and to maintain even the dimmest of lights and the subtlest of colors. Even when everything seems like it’s fading away, there will always be a line of brilliant trees waiting and growing on the horizon. I don’t know if this metaphor will make sense to anyone else, but I can’t think of a better way to describe how I’ve been feeling lately. I don’t feel like the trees are getting any closer as the days go by, but I can still see them."

You can read more about the project here.

Her website.

Her tumblog.

1 Notes

Another great collaboration courtesy of Joey Armstrong.  
"I’ve never had to describe how i approach editing before. Its interesting to think about. I don’t often shoot landscapes without people in them, so this photo felt a bit challenging to me. I usually play around until I’m happy. Sometimes I’ll edit a photo, and then the next day I’ll look at it, and decide to completely change it. I used to love bright and vivid photos, but lately I’ve been liking warm and muted colours. I rarely, if ever, edit with cool tones. I guess I want my images to look real, but at the same time, clean and warm."
Thank you to all who have contributed so far. The response has been quite encouraging. For those wondering why you are seeing slight variants on the same photograph, you can read about it here.

Another great collaboration courtesy of Joey Armstrong.  

"I’ve never had to describe how i approach editing before. Its interesting to think about. I don’t often shoot landscapes without people in them, so this photo felt a bit challenging to me. I usually play around until I’m happy. Sometimes I’ll edit a photo, and then the next day I’ll look at it, and decide to completely change it. I used to love bright and vivid photos, but lately I’ve been liking warm and muted colours. I rarely, if ever, edit with cool tones. I guess I want my images to look real, but at the same time, clean and warm."

Thank you to all who have contributed so far. The response has been quite encouraging. For those wondering why you are seeing slight variants on the same photograph, you can read about it here.

2 Notes

Shaun Dyer has the honor of being the first to respond to my open invitation. You can read more about the project here. His submission is drastically different than anything I would have envisioned for this photograph, which makes it all the more interesting. He writes,
"When I looked at the original I was drawn immediately to the lower-center of the image where the cumulous clouds seemed more defined and ominous. As I looked at it longer, I was reminded of two scenes from Gladiator. The first was the opening when the Romans launched an attack on the Gauls. It had a grainy look, dark and disorienting. Dark and disorienting has been my journey these past several months, so I when I came to your image I guess I naturally went in that direction."
Thanks Shaun.

Shaun Dyer has the honor of being the first to respond to my open invitation. You can read more about the project here. His submission is drastically different than anything I would have envisioned for this photograph, which makes it all the more interesting. He writes,

"When I looked at the original I was drawn immediately to the lower-center of the image where the cumulous clouds seemed more defined and ominous. As I looked at it longer, I was reminded of two scenes from Gladiator. The first was the opening when the Romans launched an attack on the Gauls. It had a grainy look, dark and disorienting. Dark and disorienting has been my journey these past several months, so I when I came to your image I guess I naturally went in that direction."

Thanks Shaun.

2 Notes

An Open Invitation to an Open Collaboration

Recently I purchased Young Galaxy’s new album, Shapeshifting. It’s a great record with an even better backstory. In short, the band recorded a complete album and then dropped it into the hands of Dan Lissvik, a producer they had never met. Lissvik was given free reign of the material, and proceeded to deconstruct and rework the record over a nine month period. The end result is a album that is markedly different from anything Young Galaxy has done in the past.

I’ve long thought that it would be interesting to do something similar with photographs. With Young Galaxy’s model in mind, I’ve uploaded one of my unedited RAW files to Dropbox (previewed above). You are free to download the file and post-process it in whatever way you please. I only ask that you send me the finished product so I can post the results of the collaboration here. If there aren’t any takers I won’t be terribly heart broken, but I’d love to receive a few finished pieces.

RAW File

JPEG File

The RAW file should be compatible with any version of Lightroom and Photoshop CS3 forward. To view the RAW file as I see it on my screen you must load Nikon’s “Landscape” camera profile. “Vivid” will also get you close. You can email me here.